Individual Demand for Higher Education in Tamil Nadu: A Choice between Degree Courses and Diploma Courses

  • Annamalai Jegan Assistant Professor, Department of Economics Kanchi Mamunivar Government Institute for Post-graduate Studies and Research (Autonomous) Puducherry, India https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0089-816X
Keywords: Low Cost, Short Duration, High Cost, Degree Courses, Diploma Courses

Abstract

Increasing individual demand for higher education due to achievement of higher secondary schooling and the first-generation learner try to improve their life-pattern. In this situation, the government has unable to spend for higher education due to heavy burden of School education. On the other hand, Economic reforms and liberal education policies have encouraged private sector in providing higher education. Existence of privatization has been working as de-facto commercialism. In this condition, who can affordable the high cost of higher education with long-term. This paper is focuses on the individual student’s enrolment choice between Degree courses in higher education and Diploma courses.For the purpose, the study has been taken sample area of Villupuram district in Tamil Nadu. A structured questionnaire survey schedule is used for data collection. The study made the logit model to estimate the individual (student) enrolment choice between Degree courses and Diploma courses. The model explains the student enrolment choice between degree courses in higher education and Diploma courses. The result of the study reveals shows that scholastic ability-I (secondary level), Management of Institutions, Number of siblings in the family and scholarship influencing the individual demand to choose the degree courses in higher education.

Published
2023-03-01
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How to Cite
Jegan, A. (2023). Individual Demand for Higher Education in Tamil Nadu: A Choice between Degree Courses and Diploma Courses. Shanlax International Journal of Economics, 11(2), 15-21. https://doi.org/10.34293/economics.v11i2.6073
Section
Articles